MAC continues push on Revenue Sharing Trust Fund legislation

“Revenue sharing is an unrestricted revenue source that local units of government use for the services that they need …  What we’re trying to accomplish here is to have some growth entered into the formula.”

So explained MAC’s Deena Bosworth to the House Committee on Local Government and Municipal Finance this week about bills that would create a dedicated source of dollars for local revenue sharing.  Substitute versions of the original legislation were adopted in the committee prior to joint testimony given by MAC, the Michigan Municipal League and the Michigan Townships Association. (Click here to view Bosworth’s testimony, which begins at the 20:20 mark.)

House Bills 4274, by Rep. Amos O’Neal (D-Saginaw), and 4275, by Rep. Mark Tisdel (R-Oakland), would:

  • Create a separate “Revenue Sharing Trust Fund” to receive and hold dollars solely for the purpose of fulfilling the state’s promise to local governments on revenue sharing;
  • Require that 8 percent of the revenue generated by 4 percentage points of the state’s sales tax rate be directed into the fund; and
  • Result in $601.1 million in statutory revenue sharing for all local governments across Michigan based on the May Consensus Revenue Estimate for sales tax.

Counties would receive 46.14 percent of this total in the first year, $277 million, which would be an increase of nearly $31 million from the current total.

MAC has long sought to create stability and fairness in the revenue sharing system by removing the statutory portion of it from the annual appropriations process and by designating a steady revenue source.

The bills did not receive a vote this week, and it is currently unclear if the Legislature will include these amounts and calculations in the state’s fiscal 2024 budget, which is expected to be completed early next week.

MAC has a digital advocacy campaign under way in support of these reforms and encourages all county commissioners to utilize this communication tool to notify your legislators of your support for the policy.

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

Lawmakers study Public Safety Trust Fund concept

Bills that would carve out 1.5 percent of the first 4 percentage points of the state sales tax and dedicate that revenue to public safety departments within municipalities with high crime rates were up for testimony this week in the House Committee on Local Government and Municipal Finance.

House Bill 4605, by Rep. Nate Shannon (D-Macomb), and HB 4606, by Rep. Alabas Farhat (D-Wayne), would yield about $110 million for city and township police departments based on a three-year average of violent crime rates and be disbursed on a proportional basis based on a municipality’s average share of statewide reported crimes. 

The bills would prevent eligible municipalities from supplanting existing public safety allocations with this funding unless there is a decline in total general fund from the previous year and a proportional decline in its existing reoccurring resources. 

The bills do not include direct funding for county sheriff departments, though they do allow for a pass-through of the funds should a sheriff’s department have a contract with a local municipality to provide police services.

MAC does not have an official position on the bills at this time, but several inequities in the bills have been identified. First, numerous townships across the state rely on sheriff departments for police services but do not have a contract for that service and would, therefore, be ineligible for this funding.  Second, increased policing will ultimately result in more incarcerations in county jails, thereby increasing costs at the county level without any corresponding financial assistance. Lastly, many counties in our state have law enforcement shortages and/or lack the tax base to handle the public safety needs brought on by increased tourism.

MAC will work with the bill sponsors and advocates to address our concerns while still supporting the overall effort of additional resources to address violent crime.

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

Broadband projects gearing up with new federal dollars

Michigan is slated to receive nearly $300 million in federal funding to expand broadband access across the state, according to two separate announcements this week.

About $238 million comes from the Realizing Opportunity with Broadband Infrastructure Networks (ROBIN) program to support 24 separate projects, while another $61 million comes from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) direct to Peninsula Fiber Network (PFN).

The Michigan High-Speed Internet Office (MIHI) announced Tuesday it had awarded 11 applicants a total of $238 million. Those applying for ROBIN dollars had to demonstrate public-private partnerships and an ability to match funds. This means the actual investment in broadband infrastructure through ROBIN will be $578 million. MIHI estimates these funds will help to connect more than 100,000 unserved homes, businesses, and institutions. There is a comment and objection period between now and July 31, 2023, so while these projects have been approved, they are not set in stone just yet.

As for the $61 million from NTIA, PFN has shared its plans to distribute the funds across three projects benefiting various regions of the state:

  • An underwater fiber optic link will be installed to connect Benton Harbor and Chicago.
  • The Upper Peninsula will be connected to Beaver Island and Charlevoix.
  • A route will be installed between Flint and Port Huron.

MAC is thrilled to see such substantial investments in broadband infrastructure in Michigan, and there is more to come: Michigan expects to receive roughly $1.6 billion as part of the Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment (BEAD) program in 2024. These funds will be prioritized for unserved and underserved locations and the application process will likely begin early next year.

For more information on MAC’s work on broadband, contact Madeline Fata at fata@micounties.org.

 

Justice commission bill passes Senate

A bill to establish the duties of a new Michigan Sentencing Commission passed out of the Senate on Thursday.

Senate Bill 377, by Sen. Ed McBroom (R-Dickinson), advanced out of the chamber, though its companion measure, SB 376, by Sen. Stephanie Chang (D-Wayne), did not receive a vote. This is likely due to House Bills 4173 and 4384, by Reps. Abraham Aiyash (D-Wayne) and Luke Meerman (R-Ottawa) respectively, having passed out of the House last week and being referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

None of this legislation allows for a representative of county boards of commissioners on the state panel, despite a county’s role as a funding unit and key administrative piece of local criminal justice.

In light of this deficiency, MAC remains opposed to HB 4173 and SB 376.

Given a county’s role as the funding unit, and its fiduciary responsibilities to jails, sheriff’s offices and prosecutor’s offices, it is imperative that counties have a voice, MAC Governmental Affairs Associate Samantha Gibson testified previously.

In SB 377 and HB 4384, the commission would be tasked with submitting a prison and jail impact report relating to any modifications to sentencing guidelines, including any impact on state and local correctional facilities. There are also indirect costs associated with the bills, depending on decisions made by the commission. Costs could increase or decrease, depending on changes made to sentencing guidelines. The potential for financial burdens imposed by the state onto county jails is of great concern to MAC. A county voice is crucial on the commission.

Despite the current refusal from legislators to include county commissioners on the commission, MAC will continue to press for such representation.

For more information on this issue, contact Samantha Gibson at gibson@micounties.org

 

Podcast delves into big changes for drain code

Bills designed to allow for water management districts and for the assessment of costs across watersheds in Michigan are the topic of a special episode of MAC’s Podcast 83 released on June 20.

MAC’s Deena Bosworth hosted a session with Stacy Hissong, general counsel for the Michigan Association of County Drain Commissioners (MACDC) and member of the law firm of Fahey Schultz, on the proposed rewrite of Chapter 22 of the Michigan Drain Code.

House Bills 4382-83, by Reps. Curt VanderWall (R-Mason) and Christine Morse (D-Kalamazoo) respectively, would allow local governments and residents to petition the drain commissioner for the establishment of the districts and, if found necessary, to create a plan to manage stormwater within the district in ways not currently allowed.

The plan would be unique to each district and could include actionable items like regional detention, buffer strips and the creation of wetlands, rain gardens and the like. The intent is to slow down and detain water during major storm events, instead of allowing it to flood roads, fields, businesses and homes on its way to a drain. The plan must include an estimate of the cost of each recommended activity.

The legislation is backed by MAC and MACDC.

View the full video of the episode by clicking here.

Previous episodes can be seen at MAC’s YouTube Channel.

And you always can find details about Podcast 83 on the MAC website.

 

MAC creates Opioid Settlement Learning Community to share best practices

County, city and township government officials are invited to participate in the Local Government Learning Community on Opioid Settlements hosted by MAC, the Michigan Municipal League and the Michigan Townships Association. This new network will bring together local subdivisions working to plan and spend their opioid settlement funds.

The group is intended to foster peer-to-peer learning and will include presentations from local governments on practical solutions and examples to addressing the challenges of planning for use of the settlement funds.

The initial session will take place on Friday, July 14 at noon, and meetings will continue monthly on the second Friday from noon to 1 p.m.

To register, please see the flier.

For questions on this issue, contact Amy Dolinky at dolinky@micounties.org.

 

Juvenile Justice Reform Task Force members testify before House panel

A package of 20 bills to reform the state’s juvenile justice system, supported by MAC, received a hearing in the House Committee on Criminal Justice this week. This package, House Bills 46244643, would expand the County Child Care Fund (CCF), including an increase in reimbursement rates to counties from 50 percent to 75 percent for community-based services; expand eligibility for diversion; and require the use of risk and needs assessments.

(UPDATE: Please see clarification on CCF rate changes in the Aug. 25, 2023, Legislative Update.)

In addition to expanding the CCF, the Michigan Indigent Defense Commission would be expanded to implement youth defense standards in local county defense systems; the State Appellate Defender’s Office would be required to oversee a system of appellate defense for juveniles; and court fines and fees for juveniles would be waived.

The Task Force on Juvenile Justice Reform was established by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in 2021. The bipartisan task force was chaired by Lt. Governor Gilchrist and included members from all three branches of government, as well as state and local level juvenile justice leaders and advocates. Two county commissioners served on the Task Force, each nominated by MAC. Alisha Bell of Wayne represented a county with a population over 100,000, and Marlene Webster of Shiawassee represented a county under 100,000 in population. Rep. Sarah Lightner, a former county commissioner, also served on the Task Force.

The Task Force discovered several challenges to strengthening public safety and improving outcomes for youth. Those challenges, however, led to the set of 32 recommendations last year. Six priority areas have been identified and translated into this 20-bill package.

HB 4624, by Rep. Christine Morse (D-Kalamazoo), enhances the Child Care Fund (CCF) by establishing a minimum framework of juvenile justice best practices statewide, including the use of risk screening and assessment tools. The best practices will be supported by an increase in the reimbursement rate for community-based services from 50 percent to 75 percent. These changes are essential to ensure counties have the resources to implement and utilize these approaches.

HBs 46254629 require the consistent use of validated screening and assessment tools to enable more objective decision-making and allow agencies to better match youth to appropriate supervision and services, reducing their likelihood to recidivate. The bills also expand the Diversion Act so that all offenses, with an exception for youth committing a specified juvenile violation, are eligible for pre-court diversion, based on the use of a risk-screening tool and other factors and limit the time that a youth can be placed on pre-court diversion, unless the court determines that a longer period is needed. While diversion eligibility would be expanded, judicial discretion remains.

HBs 4630 and 4631, by Rep. Lightner (R-Jackson), would expand the Michigan Indigent Defense Commission to include development, oversight, and compliance with youth defense standards in local county defense systems, and expands the State Appellate Defender Office to include appellate services for juveniles.

HBs 46344637 eliminate most non-restitution fees and costs associated with juvenile justice system involvement. The bills do not include the elimination of restitution or fees related to the Crime Victims Fund. For restitution and fees related to the Crime Victims Fund, the bills establish a standard procedure for ability to pay, determination of payment schedule, and total to be assessed.

HBs 46384642 would strengthen and expand the Office of the Children’s Ombudsman for handling, investigating, and reporting incidents in juvenile facilities.

Continued testimony is expected in the House over the coming weeks and throughout the summer.

MAC supports this package and has shared a letter of support with members of the House Criminal Justice Committee.

For more information on this issue, contact Samantha Gibson at gibson@micounties.org.

 

Michigan counties get $6 million in federal PILT funds

On June 15, the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) announced that $578.8 million will be distributed to counties in 2023 through the Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program.

“Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) are federal payments to local governments to help offset losses in property taxes due to the existence of nontaxable Federal lands within their boundaries. The original law is Public Law 94-565, dated October 20, 1976. This law was rewritten and amended by Public Law 97-258 on Sept. 13,1982, and codified at Chapter 69, Title 31 of the United States Code. The law recognizes the financial impact of the inability of local governments to collect property taxes on federally owned land.”

Thirty-one Michigan counties received $5.98 million covering 2.21 million acres of land, with payments ranging from $132 for Monroe to $709,500 for Gogebic.

Of states east of the Mississippi River, only Florida ($6.9 million) and Virginia ($6.5 million) receive more in federal PILT than Michigan.

To see the Michigan list, click here.

 

Solar PILT bills clear Michigan House

Legislation to create an optional structure for the taxes levied on solar facilities in Michigan has passed the House with bipartisan support.

After years of participation in workgroups to ensure local options, a stable funding source, appropriate zoning considerations and adequate local reimbursements, MAC has taken a neutral position on the legislation.

House Bills 4317 and 4318, by Reps. Curt VanderWall (R-Mason) and Cynthia Neeley (D-Genesee) respectively, would allow for the creation of solar energy districts by local municipalities after a mandatory public hearing. Subsequently, solar energy developers could apply for an exemption from local property taxes and instead pay a flat rate of $7,000 per megawatt of nameplate capacity per year for the proposed solar energy facility, instead of ad valorem property taxes. The payment would be locked in for 20 years and distributed based on the proportions of normal taxes that would have been paid to each taxing unit. 

An additional financial incentive would be offered for developers that choose to site their facilities on brownfield properties, in opportunity zones, as a secondary use on already improved real property (i.e., roof tops) or on state-owned property. In such cases, the reimbursement rate would be $2,000 per megawatt of nameplate capacity. 

The impetus behind the legislation is twofold. First, this methodology for compensating locals for lost taxes will provide financial predictability for the developers and the locals, hopefully avoiding the same problems we have had with the challenges to the evaluation of wind turbines. Second, the rate and process should serve as incentives for developers to build more renewable energy facilities in the state.  

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

MACPAC reaches midyear point ahead of 2022 fundraising pace

MACPAC, the association’s political action committee, has raised nearly $10,000 since December 2022, nearly matching the total for 12 months prior to last December.

MACPAC is the only PAC in Michigan devoted to supporting allies of county government in the Michigan Legislature.

As of June 13, MACPAC had received:

Allegan and Kent counties are tied at the midyear point for most commissioners donating with three each.

In the 2022 tracking year, MACPAC raised approximately $11,000.

To donate using MACPAC’s digital system, just click here.

For more information about MACPAC, visit its webpage.

 

County voices needed to push revenue sharing reform over finish line

A long-running effort to create a dedicated source of dollars for local revenue sharing is nearing fruition, but MAC needs your voice to help us push the Legislature to final enactment.

This plan, developed by MAC in concert with local governments, would:

  • Create a separate “Revenue Sharing Trust Fund” to receive and hold dollars solely for the purpose of fulfilling the state’s promise to local governments on revenue sharing;
  • Require that 8 percent of the revenue generated by 4 percentage points of the state’s sales tax rate go into the fund; and
  • Result in $591 million in statutory revenue sharing for all local governments across Michigan.

Counties would receive 46.14 percent of this total in the first year, $273 million, which would be an increase of nearly $27 million from the current total.

The plan also includes a one-time public safety investment of nearly $22 million, of which counties would get $10 million.

MAC has long sought to create stability and fairness in the revenue sharing system by removing the statutory portion of it from the annual appropriations process and by designating a steady revenue source.

By using a portion of the sales tax for a dedicated fund, this proposal meets both those key goals, and it allows for sure, steady growth in funding as long as sales tax collections remain consistently healthy.

These reforms are incorporated into two sets of bills, House Bills 427475 and Senate Bills 229230. Using the link below, please send your message of support for these measures to your legislators TODAY!

Click here to send your message of support.

 

MAC, allies continue to stave off attack on local control

Legislation that would attack the principle of local control remains bottled up in a House committee this week in the face of fierce opposition by MAC and others.

House Bills 4526-28 would eliminate local regulation of sand and gravel mining operations and were given a second hearing in the House Regulatory Reform Committee, this time to consider changes catering to requests from state officials.

Following the first committee hearing in May, the Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) submitted a list of recommendations to bill sponsors, the majority of which were incorporated in the version before the committee this week. EGLE remains neutral on the package, however. although the changes were designed to make it easier for the department to administer the new program.

MAC remains opposed to HBs 4526-28, as locals have largely been excluded from negotiations and their needs have not been considered by bill sponsors.

The aggregate and construction industry will continue to advocate for these bills, although it remains unclear when they will be voted out of committee and brought to the House floor for consideration.

If you haven’t done so yet, please use MAC’s digital Advocacy Center to send an email of opposition to your state representative.

For more information on this issue, contact Madeline Fata at fata@micounties.org.

 

Election reform implementation advances in Legislature

Legislation implementing Proposal 2 of 2022, effectively overhauling Michigan’s election system, has advanced. Senate Bills 367-374 and House Bills 4695-4702 were introduced last week to codify changes that 60 percent of Michigan voters supported last November, including at least nine days of early voting. Both bill packages passed their respective chambers on Wednesday.

The Senate package, led by Sen. Jeremy Moss (D-Oakland), passed 22-16, while the House version, led by Rep. Penelope Tsernoglou (D-Ingham), was approved 56-53.

Aside from early voting, the package includes measures for being added to the permanent absent voter list, prepaid postage for absent voter ballots, expanding access to ballot drop boxes and increasing precinct sizes.

MAC supported SB 367 and HB 4695 in committees on Tuesday, both allowing municipal clerks to jointly conduct elections with other municipalities or with their county clerk. Pooling staff and other resources can make elections more efficient and cost effective given the new circumstances.

MAC also supported SB 372, by Sen. Darrin Camilleri (D-Wayne), and HB 4697, Rep. Matt Koleszar (D-Wayne), which require each municipality to have at least one absent voter drop box per 15,000 registered electors. The state will be responsible for supplying and installing these drop boxes. MAC did not take a position on the remaining bills in each package.

It remains unclear how much funding will be allocated for implementing the changes. Appropriations subcommittee chairs received their final targets this week and fiscal year 2024 budget negotiations are ongoing. We anticipate the final version of the budget later this month.

For more information on this issue, contact Madeline Fata at fata@micounties.org.

 

Justice commission bills pass without county representation

As a funding unit and key administrative piece of local criminal justice, counties should have representation on a state commission to study criminal justice reform.

This week, however, the House passed House Bills 4173 and 4384, by Reps. Abraham Aiyash (D-Wayne) and Luke Meerman (R-Ottawa) respectively, and the Senate Judiciary Committee passed Senate Bills 376 and 377, by Sens. Stephanie Chang (D-Wayne) and Ed McBroom (R-Dickinson) respectively, that would create a state panel to study that issue that excludes county commissioner membership.

The packages are identical, with the intent to create a Criminal Justice Policy Commission and detail who will serve on it. Under the original version of HB 4173, MAC was to submit a list of three names and one of the submitted names would be selected by the governor to serve on the commission. MAC had a member on a previous commission that operated from 2015 to 2019.

However, the current version of HB 4173, and the Senate package, do not include a MAC representative on the commission. Therefore, MAC is opposing HB 4173 and SB 376.

Given a county’s role as the funding unit, and its fiduciary responsibilities to jails, sheriff’s offices and prosecutor’s offices, it is imperative that counties have a voice, MAC Governmental Affairs Associate Samantha Gibson testified last week.

In SB 377 and HB 4384, the commission would be tasked with submitting a prison and jail impact report relating to any modifications to sentencing guidelines, including any impact on state and local correctional facilities. There are also indirect costs associated with the bills, depending on decisions made by the commission. Costs could increase or decrease, depending on changes made to sentencing guidelines. The potential for financial burdens imposed by the state onto county jails is of great concern to MAC. A county voice is crucial on the commission.

Despite the current refusal from legislators to include county commissioners on the commission, MAC will continue to press for such representation.

For more information on this issue, contact Samantha Gibson at gibson@micounties.org. 

 

Governmental immunity concerns, budget news featured in podcast

The Democratic majority in the Legislature moves another step closer to an FY24 state budget, a huge package of election bills have been filed and counties need to be worried about new legislation stemming out of the Nassar scandal at Michigan State University, the Podcast 83 team noted in a new episode.

Director of Governmental Affairs Deena Bosworth, sitting in as host for Executive Director Stephen Currie, led MAC’s Madeline Fata and Samantha Gibson through all the events in Lansing over the last week. This includes:

  • Governmental immunity: MAC is opposing House Bill 4486, part of a large package to alter the statute of limitations on criminal sexual conduct and sexual misconduct, because it holds local governments and other public entities to higher standards for employee reviews than other employers, Gibson explained. Under HB 4486, county boards of commissioners would be held liable for the hiring decisions of other countywide elected officials, despite having no direct involvement in these hiring decisions.
  • Elections: Fata provided an overview of House and Senate packages written to implement the early voting and other provisions adopted by Michigan voters via Proposal 2 last fall. Not surprisingly, the sticking point is money, specifically what the state is going to do to aid county and local clerks with new requirements.
  • Criminal Justice Policy Commission: Gibson explained the current version of the enabling legislation still leaves county boards out.
  • State budget: After closed-door negotiations, Democratic appropriators have their spending “targets” to complete the fiscal 2024 state budget, Bosworth reported. If expected plans materialize, counties would see a substantial increase in revenue sharing for the coming year.

View the full video of the episode, recorded on June 12, by clicking here.

Previous episodes can be seen at MAC’s YouTube Channel.

And you always can find details about Podcast 83 on the MAC website.

 

MAC to observe Juneteenth holiday on Monday

MAC’s Lansing offices will be closed on Monday, June 19 to observe the Juneteenth holiday.

The Legislature voted this week to make Juneteenth a state holiday in wake of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issuing a proclamation in 2022 for a Juneteenth holiday for state and court employees.

MAC’s offices will reopen on Tuesday, June 20 at 8 a.m.

 

Liability concerns for counties raised in sexual conduct package

Legislation to alter the statute of limitations on criminal sexual conduct and sexual misconduct — and which could lead to broad, unintended consequences for counties — was reviewed this week by the House Committee on Criminal Justice.

House Bills 44824487 affect private employers, state government, local governments and educational institutions. HB 4486, by Rep. Karen Whitsett (D-Wayne), in particular, raises concerns, which is why MAC is opposing it.

HB 4486 holds government employers to a higher standard than that expected of private employers. The bill states an agency is liable and is not granted immunity if it “knew or should have known that the individual who committed the criminal sexual conduct had committed a prior act of criminal sexual conduct, and the governmental agency failed to act or intervene to prevent the subsequent criminal sexual conduct.”

Under HB 4486, county boards of commissioners would be held liable for the hiring decisions of other countywide elected officials, despite having no direct involvement in these hiring decisions. MAC also has concerns with the retroactive application of the potential statute of limitations and the vague, unintended consequences of HB 4486 that hold governmental agencies liable and to a higher standard than the private sector.

While there is need for reforms, MAC is working to create policy that focuses on prevention, intervention and appropriate accountability, with limited unintended consequences for the Michigan taxpayer.

For more information on this issue, contact Samantha Gibson at gibson@micounties.org.

 

Counties need voice on justice commission, MAC tells Legislature

As a funding unit and key administrative piece of local criminal justice, counties should have representation on a state commission to study criminal justice reform, a MAC staffer told a Senate committee this week.

Both the House and Senate held hearings on House Bills 4173 and 4384, by Reps. Abraham Aiyash (D-Wayne) and Luke Meerman (R-Ottawa) respectively, and Senate Bills 376 and 377, by Sens. Stephanie Chang (D-Wayne) and Ed McBroom (R-Dickinson) respectively.

The packages are identical, with the intent to create a Criminal Justice Policy Commission and detail who will serve on it. Under the original version of HB 4173, MAC was to submit a list of three names and one of the submitted names would be selected by the governor to serve on the commission. MAC had a member on the previous commission that operated from 2015 to 2019.

However, the current version of HB 4173, and the Senate package, do not include a MAC representative on the commission. Therefore, MAC is opposing HB 4173 and SB 376.

Given a county’s role as the funding unit, and its fiduciary responsibilities to jails, sheriff’s offices and prosecutor’s offices, it is imperative that counties have a voice, MAC Governmental Affairs Associate Samantha Gibson testified on Thursday.

In SB 377 and HB 4384, the commission would be tasked with submitting a prison and jail impact report relating to any modifications to sentencing guidelines, including any impact on state and local correctional facilities. There are also indirect costs associated with the bills, depending on decisions made by the commission. Costs could increase or decrease, depending on changes made to sentencing guidelines. The potential for financial burdens imposed by the state onto county jails is of great concern to MAC. A county voice is crucial on the commission.

The House panel advanced its version of the bills, while the Senate committee only took testimony.

MAC will continue to press for county representation.

For more information on this issue, please contact Samantha Gibson at gibson@micounties.org.

 

MAC seeks reimbursement in plan to expand veterans property tax exemption

Legislation to expand and streamline the state’s veterans property tax exemption were reviewed this week by the Senate Committee on Finance, Insurance and Consumer Protection.

Senate Bill 176, by Sen. Sylvia Santana (D-Wayne), SB 330, by Sen. Mary Cavanaugh (D-Wayne), and SB 364, by Sen. John Damoose (R-Emmet), are designed to grant the disabled veterans property tax exemption to surviving spouses, allow for a “one and done” application process for the exemption and provide for an audit process to determine continued eligibility and allow the local board of review, for 2023 only, to correct, upon appeal, the denial of an exemption based on “qualified errors.”

MAC has not yet taken a position on the bills but is working with the bills’ sponsors to include amendments to require the state to reimburse locals for their losses associated with the mandated exemptions.

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

MAC-backed water management bills get hearing

Bills designed to allow for water management districts and for the assessment of costs across watersheds in Michigan were discussed this week at a meeting of the House Committee on Local Government.

House Bills 4382-83, by Reps. Curt VanderWall (R-Mason) and Christine Morse (D-Kalamazoo) respectively, rewrite Chapter 22 of the Michigan Drain Code to allow local governments and residents to petition the drain commissioner for the establishment of the districts and, if found necessary, to create a plan to manage stormwater within the district in ways not currently allowed.

The plan would be unique to each district and could include actionable items like regional detention, buffer strips and the creation of wetlands, rain gardens and the like. The intent is to slow down and detain water during major storm events, instead of allowing it to flood roads, fields, businesses and homes on its way to a drain. The plan must include an estimate of the cost of each recommended activity.

The bills also require a public comment period and meeting to get feedback from residents and businesses. The local representation on the board would then vote on the plan and could choose one, multiple or none of the recommended activities. If the board votes to continue with implementation of the plan, bids would be taken for the work and assessments would be made based on benefits derived from the projects, just as it currently is for the drain code. This includes the Michigan Department of Transportation for benefits to state highways; counties for benefits to county roads; cities, villages and townships for benefit to roads and public health; and property owners based on their contribution. Impervious properties would be assessed at higher rates than agricultural land.

Proponents of the bills explained the stress on the aging infrastructure designed to drain the land for roads, developments and public health, stating the current infrastructure was primarily designed to handle stormwater in the early 1900s and cannot keep up with the intensity and frequency of major storm events in the 21st century.

Under the bills, water management districts would be allowed not mandated; locals would decide if they wanted to utilize these tools.

MAC and the Michigan Association of County Drain Commissioners support the legislation.

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

Early voting legislation discussed; funding not yet resolved

Legislation has been introduced to implement Proposal 2 of 2022, effectively overhauling Michigan’s election system. Last November, 60 percent of Michigan voters approved a new constitutional amendment to allow for nine days of early voting, among other provisions. Senate Bills 367-374 and House Bills 4695-4702 will codify Proposal 2 into law.

The Senate package, led by Sen. Jeremy Moss (D-Oakland), was brought before the Senate Elections and Ethics Committee on Wednesday, while Rep. Penelope Tsernoglou (D-Ingham) led the charge in the House Elections Committee on Thursday. Representatives from Promote the Vote, the Michigan Association of Municipal Clerks, the Michigan Association of County Clerks and the Secretary of State’s Office took turns commenting on each of the eight bills as the lead stakeholders. Aside from early voting, the package includes measures for being added to the permanent absent voter list, prepaid postage for absent voter ballots, expanding access to ballot drop boxes, and increasing precinct sizes.

Counties will be most directly affected by the early voting component and the cost of administering elections for additional days. Under SB 367, municipal clerks will have the option to jointly conduct elections with other municipalities or with their county clerk. Some clerks may find that pooling staff and other resources is beneficial given the new circumstances.

Unfortunately, the topic of funding was largely avoided by committee members and stakeholders. Chair Moss briefly noted budget negotiations are currently ongoing. In January, Secretary of State Joselyn Benson estimated the new constitutional amendment would cost locals between $30 million and $50 million annually. The final version of the state’s FY24 budget is expected to be approved later this month and will likely include some, if not all, of the funding necessary to implement these changes.

MAC has not taken a formal position on this legislation but will report on the funding allocation once it is finalized.

For more information on this issue, contact Madeline Fata at fata@micounties.org.

 

MAC, NACo oppose amendment to federal broadband law

An amendment to preempt local control over telecommunication infrastructure projects has passed the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce and will be presented to Congress for approval. The amendment is to the American Broadband Deployment Act of 2023, also known as H.R. 3557, and provisions include:

  • Preemption of state and local zoning authority over the placement of wireless technologies, including towers, equipment, and small cells
  • Elimination of state and local government authority to manage public rights-of-way (ROW) by collecting fair market compensation for their use and management, and limiting ROW fees to “actual, objectively reasonable costs”
  • Enactment of shot clock rules and “deemed granted” provisions which place timelines for the review and approval of telecommunications projects
  • Prohibition of state and local governments from revoking cable franchises.

Counties own much of the infrastructure necessary to build or expand telecommunication networks, including pole attachments and rights-of-way, and should be closely involved in the permitting and construction process. As the federal government prepares to distribute $42.45 billion to expand broadband through the BEAD program, with Michigan slated to receive roughly $1.6 billion, this legislation will damage the ability for local governments to serve as partners in the deployment process.

Furthermore, by enforcing a “shot clock” on the permitting process, counties will be unable to properly assess each application and the impact these projects will have on their communities.

The National Association of Counties (NACo) hosted a webinar late last week encouraging county officials to contact their federal legislators opposing this amendment.

Please utilize MAC’s Advocacy Center to send a prepared email of opposition to your member of Congress.

For more information on this issue, contact Madeline Fata at fata@micounties.org.

 

Podcast 83 dives into Michigan water issues in special episode

How Michigan’s local governments can mitigate the damage of flooding is the topic of a special episode of MAC’s Podcast 83.

Stacy Hissong, partner at Fahey Schultz and legal adviser to the Michigan Association of County Drain Commissioners, is the featured guest on the episode, which is hosted by Deena Bosworth, MAC’s governmental affairs director.

The pair discuss:

  • Excess flooding and how local governments can deal with it with tools they have now
  • Legislation in Lansing to create more tools to aid residents in avoiding damage
  • The history of how Michigan has dealt with groundwater and why the state has challenges now

View the full video of the episode, recorded on May 30, by clicking here.

Previous episodes can be seen at MAC’s YouTube Channel.

And you always can find details about Podcast 83 on the MAC website.

 

Counties have until June 15 to file for pension grants

Applications for the Protecting MI Pension Grant Program must be submitted no later than June 15, 2023, using the electronic submission system (Michigan eSignature Solution), the state Department of Treasury advised.

Click to apply.

Qualified units are strongly encouraged to ensure the accuracy and completeness of of the application packet prior to submission. For detailed information regarding the Protecting MI Pension Grant application process or the Michigan eSignature Solution, please visit the Protecting MI Pension Grant Application website at www.michigan.gov/MIPensionGrant. On this page you can also access application forms, instructions, checklists, a sample governing body resolution, and frequently asked questions related to this grant application process.

As a reminder, in addition to the application submitted online through Michigan’s eSignature Solution, the following supporting documentation is required to be attached prior to submission.

  • Protecting MI Pension Grant Affidavit (Form 5887): Must be signed by Chief Administrative Officer and Notarized.
  • Copy of approved local government governing body resolution authorizing the chief administrative officer to file a claim for a grant payment for the Protecting MI Pension Grant Program.  
  • Copy of actuarial valuation(s) utilized in audited financial statements used to complete the most recent Form 5572 submitted as of 12/31/2021 for all qualified retirement systems that are requesting grant awards. 
  • Most recent actuarial valuation as of 12/31/2022 for all qualified retirement systems that are requesting grant awards. 
  • Copy of court ordered judgement levying a millage to cover local government pension costs (only required if applicable)

Additional information related to FAQs, program guidelines, and application materials are available at www.Michigan.gov/MIPensionGrant . Please be sure to sign up for Treasury – Local Government email alerts to be notified of additional updates to this grant program and other local government notifications.  

The Michigan Department of Treasury (Treasury) reminds municipalities that, although not required, they can review and correct errors in Treasury’s calculation of each municipality’s millage rate eligible for the 2023 Personal Property Tax (PPT) reimbursement (MCL 123.1345(x)(ii)(B) and MCL 123.1353(5)).

 

Time to review millage rate calculations

The Local Community Stabilization Authority (LCSA) Act requires Treasury to make the eligible millage rate calculations available by May 1. The eligible millage rate calculations can be found on Treasury’s 2023 PPT Reimbursements website under the “Millage Rate Comparison Reports” heading. These 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports are intended to be used by municipalities to verify the accuracy of the eligible millage rates to be used in their 2023 PPT reimbursement calculations. 

How to review the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports:

  • Verify individual millage rate(s) levied in 2022
    • Municipalities should compare the individual millage rate(s) levied in 2022 on the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports with the millage rates reported on their 2022 Form 614 – Tax Rate Request (L-4029).
    • Each millage rate reported on the 2022 Form 614 should be listed on the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports (excluding special assessments).
  • Verify calculated millage rate used in the computation
    • The calculated millage rates to be used in the 2023 PPT reimbursement calculations should equal the lesser of the eligible millage cap and the 2022 millage rate.
    • The Millage Rate Calculation tab of the Excel workbook provides information about how each eligible millage rate is calculated.
    • NOTE: Calculated eligible millage rates may be prorated and thus may not reflect the actual millage rates levied by the municipality.

When NO millage rate errors are identified:

If a municipality does not identify an error in the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports, the municipality does not need to file a form or take any further action to notify Treasury.

When errors ARE identified:

If a municipality does identify an error in the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports, the municipality will need to complete the Form 5613Millage Rate Correction for the 2023 Personal Property Tax Reimbursement Calculations to notify Treasury of the error(s). In addition to the correction form, municipalities must provide substantiating documentation to support the millage correction.

The reporting forms related to the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports (along with the associated deadlines) are available on Treasury’s Forms for Calculation of PPT Reimbursements website.

  • Form 5608Portion of 2022 Essential Services Millage Rate Dedicated for the Cost of Essential Services
    • Optional form to be used by counties, cities, villages, townships, and local authorities that levy an extra-voted millage rate that partially funds the cost of essential services (for example a Fire/Cemetery millage).
    • NOTE: For extra-voted millage rates with a name that implies the millage was partially dedicated for the cost of essential services, Treasury has identified the millage type as “PARTIAL ESSENTIAL SERVICE” on the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports.
    • DUE DATE: Aug. 1, 2023  
  • Form 5613Millage Rate Correction for the 2023 Personal Property Tax Reimbursement Calculations
    • Optional form to be used by municipalities that identify an error in the 2023 Millage Rate Comparison Reports.
    • DUE DATE: Aug. 1, 2023

The corrections reported on Form 5613 and the essential services percentage reported on Form 5608 will be used in the calculation of the 2023 PPT reimbursements.

Form 5613 and Form 5608 submissions will not be accepted after Aug. 1, 2023.

Please direct any questions regarding the PPT reimbursement calculation or correction process to TreasORTAPPT@michigan.gov or 517-335-7484.

Additional information is available at www.michigan.gov/pptreimbursement.

 

State seeks infrastructure ‘champions’ for classes

The Michigan Infrastructure Council (MIC), Water Asset Management Council (WAMC), and Transportation Asset Management Council (TAMC) have been focusing efforts on creating a statewide culture of asset management through several initiatives. One of the MIC’s initiatives is the Champions training program, which will have a new class starting in August.

The new class begins Aug. 1 and runs through Nov. 1, 2023.

To learn more about the program and apply, click here. The deadline to apply for this free training is July 26, 2023.

Since 2021, the MIC has trained more than 300 professionals from various backgrounds (engineering, finance, planning, elected officials) in key subject areas such as risk management, knowledge management, and strategic decision-making as they apply to infrastructure assets. Based on positive feedback and a growing list of graduate referrals, the MIC has committed to offering a second cohort of AM Champions in 2023.

For more information, contact Nathan Hamilton of the MIC at hamiltonn4@michigan.gov.

 

Deal reached, adopted to avoid federal debt default

“After several rounds of negotiations, the White House and House Republican Leadership reached an agreement to address the debt limit and cap spending,” the  National Association of Counties (NACo) reported. “The deal, titled the Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2023 (FRA) (H.R. 3746), would suspend the debt ceiling through January 1, 2025, effectively increasing the amount of money that the federal government can borrow to fund federal programs. On January 19, 2022, the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced that the federal government had hit its $34.1 trillion debt limit. This agreement comes less than a week ahead of the deadline after which the federal government would no longer have the capacity to pay its obligations.

“After quickly passing the House, the legislation passed the Senate by a vote of 63-36 on June 1, ensuring the federal government will not run out of money to pay its bills on Monday, June 5, the day the government would default on its debt.

“The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its assessment of the bill’s impact on federal debt and deficits. CBO estimated that if the legislation were enacted, budget deficits would be reduced by about $1.5 trillion over the next decade and interest on the public debt would be reduced by an estimated $188 billion.

“NACo applauds our federal partners for reaching a bipartisan agreement to raise the federal debt ceiling. While this is a significant move that will provide much-needed certainty to counties, there are a handful of provisions of relevance to local leaders including spending cuts, permitting reform, implementing new work requirements for certain federal public assistance programs and reinstating federal student loan payments.

“A comprehensive analysis of the Fiscal Responsibility Act and its impact on county governments can be found here.”

 

Podcast 83 takes look at much-needed juvenile justice package

In a special episode of Podcast 83, MAC Governmental Affairs Associate Samantha Gibson provides a detailed overview of a 20-bill package to reform Michigan’s juvenile justice system.

Juvenile justice reform has long been a priority for MAC and the issue gained momentum with the release of recommendations from a state task force formed in 2021. The new legislative package is largely built on the task force’s ideas and is strongly supported by MAC.

Increasing the Child Care Fund reimbursement rate for counties to 75 percent, from the current 50 percent, is the no. 1 priority for MAC in this package, Gibson explained.

Also, the package will reform juvenile justice services by using mental health and risk screening tools to benefit youth in the system and allow counties to better serve court-involved youth. The best practices that would be implemented within this policy, Gibson said, will allow for rehabilitation and reintroduction into society, as well as lead to reduced recidivism rates for court-involved youth.

View the full video of the episode, recorded on May 23, by clicking here.

For links to all the bill texts in the package, see MAC’s May 26, 2023, Legislative Update.

Previous episodes can be seen at MAC’s YouTube Channel.

And you always can find details about Podcast 83 on the MAC website.

 

New state council to study population issue

A new state body will analyze the factors affecting Michigan’s population and what steps can be taken to spur growth, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced at a Mackinac Island event this week.

Via Executive Order, Whitmer is forming the “Growing Michigan Together Council,” which will have 21 voting members and seven non-voting members.

The council is charged with four tasks:

  • “Identify concrete, data-driven and evidence-based goals to grow the state’s population, improve educational outcomes from preschool through postsecondary education, attract and retain talent and build long-term, sustainable infrastructure that meets the needs of the population;
  • “Define the gap between Michigan and the best-performing states on the goals identified by the council;
  • “Identify specific short-term, medium-term and long-term policies needed to close these gaps and meet the goals identified by the council; and
  • “Analyze the effectiveness of existing programs and spending dedicated to achieving the goals identified by the council and make recommendations on how to address any gaps between projected revenues and recommended expenditures.”

MAC will be monitoring appointments to the council and its work and will report to membership as needed.

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

Land tax proposal highlighted at Mackinac Policy Conference

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is calling on the Legislature to enact a land value tax system to tackle the obstacles cities face in revitalization efforts. Duggan made a presentation at this week’s Mackinac Policy Conference on Mackinac Island.

Although MAC does not have legislative language to review at this time, the idea is to increase taxes paid on vacant land and blighted properties and decrease the tax on occupied residential buildings. The intent is to offset the revenue and prevent absent property owners from sitting on property that could otherwise be developed or repurposed.

MAC will watch this proposal closely and work within our committee process to evaluate it.

For more information on this issue, contact Deena Bosworth at bosworth@micounties.org.

 

Check out videos from 2023 Legislative Conference

MAC’s Deena Bosworth leads the legislative leadership panel at the 2023 Legislative Conference on April 26.

For those unable to attend the recent 2023 Legislative Conference, or if your notes taken are not as comprehensive as you wish, MAC has created a series of videos of state leaders speaking on key issues during the conference. All the links below will take you to MAC’s YouTube channel, where you also can find videos of our Podcast 83.

For all the presentations from the three-day conference, visit MAC’s website.

 

June 8 fiscal webinar to focus on internal controls

The Michigan Department of Treasury and Michigan State University Extension (MSU Extension) are hosting the next “Fiscally Ready” webinar on June 8, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET. This FREE training is designed to assist both appointed and elected officials.

Managing Internal Controls – Register Now

This training will include a deep dive into internal controls. It will cover what internal controls are, why you need them, how they help your community, how to implement them, and where to start.

What will be covered:

  • Building a culture of fiscal sustainability
  • The role of internal controls in fiscal sustainability
  • Understanding internal controls and their importance
  • How internal controls help strengthen your community
  • Best practices for internal controls implementation

Register Now

For more information about Fiscally Ready Communities, please check out the Treasury Fiscally Ready Communities webpage. This webpage includes Treasury’s 32-page Fiscally Ready Communities Best Practices document, which we encourage all local officials to review.

If you have any questions, please email TreasLocalGov@michigan.gov with the subject line “Fiscally Ready.”

 

Five Michigan counties receive NACo awards

The work of five Michigan counties was honored recently by the National Association of Counties (NACo) via its 2023 Achievement Awards.

The Achievement Awards Program is a non-competitive awards program which seeks to recognize innovative county government programs.

Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, Midland and Wayne were honored in at least one of 18 different categories in the award program. Macomb alone was cited a whopping 10 times across the categories, with Oakland claiming 5 citations, Wayne 3 and Midland and Washtenaw 1 each.

Midland was honored for its Communities of Excellence program, which “is designed to bring together businesses, nonprofits and government agencies to work collaboratively towards common goals, using the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program’s framework for organizational excellence. … It provides participating organizations with training, resources and support to help them achieve their goals and become recognized as models of excellence.”

 

MAC-backed juvenile justice package begins legislative journey

A package of 20 bills to reform the state’s juvenile justice system, supported by MAC, was introduced in the House this week and referred to the chamber’s Criminal Justice Committee.

The package, House Bills 46244643, is a result of the Michigan Task Force on Juvenile Justice Reform’s recommendations provided last July.

The Task Force on Juvenile Justice Reform was established by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in 2021. The bipartisan task force was chaired by Lt. Governor Gilchrist and included members from all three branches of government, as well as state and local level juvenile justice leaders and advocates. Two county commissioners served on the Task Force, each nominated by MAC. Alisha Bell of Wayne represented a county commissioner from a county with a population over 100,000, and Marlene Webster of Shiawassee represented a county commissioner from a county under 100,000 in population. Rep. Sarah Lightner, a former county commissioner, also served on the Task Force.

The Task Force discovered several challenges to strengthening public safety and improving outcomes for youth. Those challenges, however, led to the set of 32 recommendations last year. Six priority areas have been identified and translated into this 20-bill package.

HB 4624, by Rep. Christine Morse (D-Kalamazoo), enhances the Child Care Fund (CCF) by establishing a minimum framework of juvenile justice best practices statewide, including the use of risk screening and assessment tools. The best practices will be supported by an increase in the reimbursement rate for community-based services from 50 percent to 75 percent. These changes are essential to ensure counties have the resources to implement and utilize these approaches.

(UPDATE: Please see clarification on CCF rate changes in the Aug. 25, 2023, Legislative Update.)

HBs 46254629 require the consistent use of validated screening and assessment tools to enable more objective decision-making and allow agencies to better match youth to appropriate supervision and services, reducing their likelihood to recidivate. The bills also expand the Diversion Act so that all offenses, with an exception for youth committing a specified juvenile violation, are eligible for pre-court diversion, based on the use of a risk-screening tool and other factors and limit the time that a youth can be placed on pre-court diversion, unless the court determines that a longer period is needed. While diversion eligibility would be expanded, judicial discretion remains.

HBs 4630 and 4631, by Rep. Lightner (R-Jackson), would expand the Michigan Indigent Defense Commission to include development, oversight, and compliance with youth defense standards in local county defense systems, and expands the State Appellate Defender Office to include appellate services for juveniles.

HBs 46344637 eliminate most non-restitution fees and costs associated with juvenile justice system involvement. The bills do not include the elimination of restitution or fees related to the Crime Victims Fund. For restitution and fees related to the Crime Victims Fund, the bills establish a standard procedure for ability to pay, determination of payment schedule, and total to be assessed.

HBs 46384642 would strengthen and expand the Office of the Children’s Ombudsman for handling, investigating, and reporting incidents in juvenile facilities.

A committee hearing is expected in the coming weeks, as well as the introduction of this bill package in the Senate.

MAC supports this package and has shared a letter of support with members of the House Criminal Justice Committee.

For more information on this issue, contact Samantha Gibson at gibson@micounties.org.

 

MAC releases Opioid Settlement Dashboard

MAC has officially released an Opioid Settlement Dashboard on the Opioid Settlement Resource Center webpage. The dashboard includes six pages of information about current funds and county readiness for spending.

The home page looks at settlement funds, highlighting the maximum number of payments per company, state and local shares, reporting requirements and, most importantly, allows counties to use a dropdown menu to see their estimated total amounts of funds per settlement.

The technical assistance page provides a map of counties that are engaged with MAC specifically for technical assistance related to settlements and highlights when these requests occurred.

Four additional pages utilize data from the Opioid Settlement Baseline Assessment to illustrate county plans for stakeholder engagement, county planning, management of funds and monitoring of funds and activities.

Since many counties are still in the planning phases, the dashboard points to three areas where additional information will be added in the future: areas of investment, links to public-facing plans and reports as well as additional monitoring.

For more information on MAC’s opioid settlement resources, contact Amy Dolinky at dolinky@micounties.org.

 

Podcast 83 episode reviews budget, juvenile justice news

Legislators have enough money to pass a fiscal 2024 budget that includes significant increases in county revenue sharing and in reimbursements from the Child Care Fund, among other county priorities, MAC’s Podcast 83 team reported this week.

Host Stephan Currie and Deena Bosworth, Madeline Fata and Samantha Gibson of MAC’s Governmental Affairs Team reviewed a variety of positive developments for counties in recent days:

  • State budget: The Consensus Revenue Estimating Conference, held May 19, showed that legislators have the resources to spend at least $14 billion in the General Fund, which is good news for revenue sharing, among other items.
  • Revenue sharing: Bosworth reported great process on MAC’s Revenue Sharing Trust Fund project, a joint effort with local governments, to create a dedicated fund, backed by a percentage of sales tax revenues, for revenue sharing.
  • Juvenile justice: Gibson reported on a 20-bill package filed in Lansing to enact a wide variety of MAC-supported recommendations from a state task force that studied improvements for the juvenile justice system.
  • Statewide septic code: Fata reported on the expected filing of legislation to enact a statewide septic code and MAC’s ongoing review of that legislation.

View the full video of the episode, recorded on May 22, by clicking here.

Previous episodes can be seen at MAC’s YouTube Channel.

And you always can find details about Podcast 83 on the MAC website.

 

Webinar will focus on Opioid Settlement Exhibit E and allowable uses

On June 8, the second webinar in the Opioid Settlement Technical Assistance Learning Series will be held from 2:30 p.m. to  3:30 p.m. (EST), providing a discussion on Exhibit E. The series is hosted by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, in partnership with Michigan State University, University of Michigan and Wayne State University as part of their Technical Assistance Collaborative.

The webinars are intended to provide information from experts for officials and representatives from counties, municipalities and townships, including community members, to aid in their opioid settlement investment processes. This webinar, titled “Overview of the Opioid Settlement and Discussion on Exhibit E,” will focus on allowable uses of funding. See the flier and register by clicking “Register Today.”

For more information on opioid settlements are technical assistance, contact Amy Dolinky at dolinky@micounties.org.

 

MAC offices closed on Memorial Day

MAC’s offices in Lansing will be closed on Monday, May 29 in observance of Memorial Day.

Normal office hours will resume at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, May 30.

 

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